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Frequently Asked Questions



Answer

Hypoallergenic diets are designed to be highly digestible and low residue for use in pets that suffer allergies or sensitivities to certain dietary constituents. There are various types of hypoallergenic diet, ranging from the true veterinary prescription hydrolyzed diets (for example Hills z/d) to those that are simply free from some of the most common allergens such as wheat and dairy.

Pets can suffer from adverse food reactions for a number of different reasons. It can be due to true allergies or it can be what is termed an ‘adverse food reaction’ to a dietary constituent. Although the symptoms may appear to be the same in both cases, the immunological cascade that is going on inside the pet’s body will be different. However, in either situation, the use of a hypoallergenic diet is indicated, where the dietary constituent that triggered the reaction is removed.

Certain breeds of dog have specific adverse food reactions, such as the Irish Setter who has gluten sensitive enteropathy. These dogs need to be fed hypoallergenic diets that are wheat gluten free.

A hypoallergenic diet is a broad term for a diet that does not contain common dietary allergens. So, many pet foods can be labeled ‘hypoallergenic’ because they do not include wheat, dairy products, soya or beef – the most common allergens for pets. These diets may well be suitable for most pets, as it is a good idea to avoid these allergens if possible, thus reducing the potential for the pet to develop allergies or sensitivities later in life.

According to the latest figures amongst the most common allergens in dog foods are beef, dairy products, wheat, lamb, eggs, chicken, soya and pork. For cats the story is slightly different, with beef, dairy and fish heading the list and wheat and cereals not far behind. The majority of allergens are proteins; even within the wheat and carbohydrate constituents it is the protein within these foods that are responsible for the adverse reaction. Some individuals are also sensitive to the exact way that the protein has been treated or processed, such that they may tolerate certain types or brands of food but not others.

It is also worth noting that there is also quite a high degree of cross reactivity between allergens. For example, if the pet is sensitive to chicken for instance then it is advisable to avoid duck and turkey too as there is emerging evidence of common allergens in avian meats.

Here at Lily’s Kitchen all of our diets are soya and GM free. 

Answer:

My pet needs a hypoallergenic diet. Is Lily's Kitchen suitable for her?

Hypoallergenic diets are designed to be highly digestible and low residue for use in pets that suffer allergies or sensitivities to certain dietary constituents. There are various types of hypoallergenic diet, ranging from the true veterinary prescription hydrolyzed diets (for example Hills z/d) to those that are simply free from some of the most common allergens such as wheat and dairy.

Pets can suffer from adverse food reactions for a number of different reasons. It can be due to true allergies or it can be what is termed an ‘adverse food reaction’ to a dietary constituent. Although the symptoms may appear to be the same in both cases, the immunological cascade that is going on inside the pet’s body will be different. However, in either situation, the use of a hypoallergenic diet is indicated, where the dietary constituent that triggered the reaction is removed.

Certain breeds of dog have specific adverse food reactions, such as the Irish Setter who has gluten sensitive enteropathy. These dogs need to be fed hypoallergenic diets that are wheat gluten free.

A hypoallergenic diet is a broad term for a diet that does not contain common dietary allergens. So, many pet foods can be labeled ‘hypoallergenic’ because they do not include wheat, dairy products, soya or beef – the most common allergens for pets. These diets may well be suitable for most pets, as it is a good idea to avoid these allergens if possible, thus reducing the potential for the pet to develop allergies or sensitivities later in life.

According to the latest figures amongst the most common allergens in dog foods are beef, dairy products, wheat, lamb, eggs, chicken, soya and pork. For cats the story is slightly different, with beef, dairy and fish heading the list and wheat and cereals not far behind. The majority of allergens are proteins; even within the wheat and carbohydrate constituents it is the protein within these foods that are responsible for the adverse reaction. Some individuals are also sensitive to the exact way that the protein has been treated or processed, such that they may tolerate certain types or brands of food but not others.

It is also worth noting that there is also quite a high degree of cross reactivity between allergens. For example, if the pet is sensitive to chicken for instance then it is advisable to avoid duck and turkey too as there is emerging evidence of common allergens in avian meats.

Here at Lily’s Kitchen all of our diets are soya and GM free.